White Corduroy Jacket – Take 1


Here is the first iteration of my latest project. I made one to sell, as well, but it still needs buttons and buttonholes. I did not feel like pressing before photographing it, and really, I would not press a corduroy jacket anyway, so this is what it will look like when I wear it.

The fabric is a cotton/cashmere corduroy from Michael’s Fabrics, lined with silk charmeuse. I quilted the lining to make the jacket more cardigan-like, and added a bias trim around the openings at front, bottom, and sleeves. The buttons are shell. 

For this jacket, I played around a bit with the grain lines, cutting the center front and center back pieces on the cross-grain. I love the way it looks with the grain lines going every which way, but I’m really not sure how others feel about that. For the one I made to sell, I cut it all on the straight grain. I was afraid that people might look at it on Etsy and think that I cut some pieces on the cross because I was low on fabric or something. Which leads me to a question for you. Do you think it looks cool to have the grain lines going in all directions, or do you think it looks messy? Please be honest and don’t worry about hurting my feelings.  It will be very helpful to me to know what people think about this.

You can see the grain lines going on the bias on the binding, cross on the cf piece, and straight on the pocket.

.

The buttonholes on the cuffs are functional. I will wear it with one unbuttoned.

.

I embroidered and Elizabethan snail dragon on the lining.

Advertisements

26 Comments

  1. Posted October 17, 2010 at 4:59 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Great work with that corduroy grain — I know how hard corduroy can be!

  2. Posted October 17, 2010 at 5:05 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Personally, I think the differing grain lines add a spark of interest.

    I love the fabric and the way you used the bias cut for the binding.

    It’s a great jacket!

  3. frifris
    Posted October 17, 2010 at 5:07 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I believe noone would think cutting the corduroy cross-grain is a measure of saving fabric. The jacket looks very nice, and I like the different use of the grain – makes the jacket a lot more interesting!

  4. Posted October 17, 2010 at 5:07 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I like the different grain lines; it looks intentional in the photo. The corduroy must feel wonderful, given the fiber content.

  5. Posted October 17, 2010 at 5:16 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Wowza! When I clicked on the first picture and realized that you played with the grain on a corduroy I was just amazed and it a good way. What a wonderful way to use that fabric in a different way. I personally love it and may be copying you. So no it doesn’t look like you ran out of fabric. It looks like you used your designer’s eye to use a common fabric in a newer, more up-to-date look! Awesome Claudine but I’m always astounded at how you look at things and come up with some truly beautiful pieces!

  6. Annette
    Posted October 17, 2010 at 6:05 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I like it — a Lot. Using different grainlines added interest taking the texture of the corduroy to a higher level. Your work is always amazing.

  7. Posted October 17, 2010 at 6:12 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I love the cross grains! Your jacket looks so couture, you will forget it is corduroy. I shy away from buying corduroy cause it is ‘boring’. I will certainly rethink this fabric in the future. I also love the bias trim verses incorporating another fabric or trim piece. Thanks for sharing!

  8. Posted October 17, 2010 at 6:12 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I have a renewed interest in cordouroy. Love the way you played with the grain as a design element and the lines of the jacket would be lovely in any fabric. Great work – as always.

  9. Posted October 17, 2010 at 6:31 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Oh, Claudine, it is stunning! I love what you did with the grainlines and the fabric sounds positively delicious.

  10. Posted October 17, 2010 at 6:42 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I like the different grainlines. It looks like a design choice, not a case of running out of fabric. Very cool. Love the jacket.

  11. Meredith P
    Posted October 17, 2010 at 7:00 pm | Permalink | Reply

    The grainlines make it special, rather than a run of the mill corduroy jacket. I love what you did.

  12. Posted October 17, 2010 at 7:16 pm | Permalink | Reply

    The grainlines look great but the bias edging on the sleeve is even better. I do wonder if the bias might stand out more without the cross-grain. I’ll be eager to see your Etsy post.

  13. Posted October 17, 2010 at 7:37 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I love how the corduroy utilizes different grains. It looks intentional to me, so I think that it wouldn’t turn people off, but I do like “different”, so I may not be the best judge. 🙂

    I hope your etsy shop does well!!!

    • Posted October 17, 2010 at 8:20 pm | Permalink | Reply

      As I read all of these extremely gracious comments, I am realizing that, in general, my blog readers all probably like “different”, or you would not be here. But thank you anyway.

  14. cidell
    Posted October 17, 2010 at 7:46 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I love it in all directions. What a nice nice fabric!

  15. L Hutch
    Posted October 18, 2010 at 1:11 am | Permalink | Reply

    What a brilliant design idea! I love the diffeent grainlines. I will add that to my notebook of ideas to try.

  16. Posted October 18, 2010 at 3:45 am | Permalink | Reply

    If it looks intentional it can look fantastic! Yours is beautiful. I love how you embroidered a little motif on the inside, so cute and a nice little surprise for yourself whenever you put it on. I like that.

  17. Posted October 18, 2010 at 4:30 am | Permalink | Reply

    What a lux corduroy jacket! The indulgent fabric, bias grains, and Elizabethan dragon really take it up a notch.

  18. Posted October 18, 2010 at 8:23 am | Permalink | Reply

    Very cute! No way does this look like a “short of fabric” effort. I too love playing with grain lines/stripes, so this jacket really speaks to me. Curious, what pattern did you use?

  19. Posted October 18, 2010 at 3:31 pm | Permalink | Reply

    Recently, I have been researching Coco Chanel and this reminds me a lot of her early cardigan-like jackets in the 1930s. I love the grain differences and it looks intentional. The only person who would think otherwise (if they did) would be someone who sews, non-sewers wouldn’t even give it a second thought. Great job!

    • Posted October 18, 2010 at 9:42 pm | Permalink | Reply

      Hmm, you are probably right about people who do not sew not thinking about grain lines in the same way.

  20. Sharon Killian
    Posted October 18, 2010 at 6:53 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I love the varying grain lines – more sophisticated, edgy, & fashionable.

  21. Posted October 19, 2010 at 9:08 am | Permalink | Reply

    I especially like the little embroidery on the lining. Nice touch!

  22. Posted October 19, 2010 at 8:37 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I absolutely love it – and the Elizabethan snail dragon! Some people might not get the differing grain lines, but that would be their loss. I think it makes the jacket so much more interesting, and kudos for doing that much work with corduroy, a fabric that I love (and hate to sew with).

  23. Posted October 20, 2010 at 12:27 am | Permalink | Reply

    Yesterday, Amanda posted a jacket with corduroy grain in different directions. Must be something in the air. 🙂 Check out her beautiful Anna Sui version: http://amandasadventuresinsewing.blogspot.com/2010/10/vogue-2734-anna-sui-brown-corduroy.html

    Did some designer do this recently? Anyway, I agree that it’s fashion forward, which I like. Hopefully some fashion forward customers find your etsy shop. 🙂

  24. Posted October 22, 2010 at 2:47 pm | Permalink | Reply

    I love grain lines going every which way, but I am not known for my “classic” taste, lol.

Post a Comment

Required fields are marked *

*
*

%d bloggers like this: